Pop Quiz: Is Your Child Getting Enough Sleep?

Pop Quiz: Is Your Child Getting Enough Sleep?

It’s time for school-age kids, adolescents, and teenagers to say goodbye to summer and return to a school routine. One important component of the routine for students should be getting enough sleep. Getting enough sleep is important for everyone, regardless of age, but it’s especially important for kids and even teenagers. Take our quiz to discover the facts on the importance of sleep for young people.

1.) True or false? Children, adolescents and teens who do not get enough sleep have a higher risk of obesity, diabetes, injuries, poor mental health, and problems with attention and behavior.

2.) How many hours of sleep does the American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommend children ages 6 to 12 years old should get every 24 hours?

  1. 7-10 hours
  2. 8-11 hours
  3. 9-12 hours
  4. None of the above

3.) How many hours of sleep does the American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommend children ages 13 to 18 years old should get every 24 hours?

  1. 8–10 hours
  2. 9-11 hours
  3. 10-12 hours
  4. None of the above

4.) True or false? Teens experience a natural shift in their circadian rhythms that makes it more difficult for them to fall asleep before 11 p.m.

5.) Why should teens get an adequate amount of sleep every night?

  1. Teens are too moody when sleepy.
  2. Teens are going through a second developmental stage of cognitive maturation and additional sleep supports their developing brain and physical growth spurts, and sleep helps protect them from undesirable outcomes like depression and drug use.
  3. Teens are more likely to develop sleep-related illnesses and conditions without adequate sleep.
  4. Sleep patterns for adulthood are set during the teenage years.

6.) True or false? Teens generally require more sleep per night than some younger children and adults.

7.) What are signs or symptoms that your child, adolescent or teen is not getting enough sleep?

  1. Your student has a hard time waking up in the morning, is often late for school, and/or sleeps a lot on the weekends.
  2. They have mood swings and become irritable early in the afternoon.
  3. Has trouble in school and/or displays aggression.
  4. Displays nervousness, confusion, and/or lack of motivation.
  5. All of the above

8.) True or false? In addition to increasing the risk of accidents, injuries, high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes and depression, a sleep deficit is also linked to an increased risk of self-harm, suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts in teens.

9.) How can parents help kids and adolescents to get enough sleep?

  1. Help kids and adolescents stick to a consistent sleep schedule.
  2. Limit light exposure and electronics an hour or two before bedtime.
  3. Encourage a quiet, calm time that’s free of food for about an hour or so before bed.
  4. All of the above

10.) What are additional ways that parents can help teens to get more sleep?

  1. Limit a teen’s use of caffeine after 3 p.m.
  2. Encourage short, midafternoon naps that last no longer than 30 minutes.
  3. Tie getting enough sleep to privileges, like driving.
  4. All of the above.

compiled by ERIKA ALDRICH / Information provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Sleep.org, and the Mayo Clinic.

ANSWERS

  1. True. Studies have shown that not getting enough sleep increases the risk of obesity, diabetes, accidental injuries, poor mental health, and problems with attention and behavior in teens.
  2. C. 9-12 hours. Kids 6 to 12 years of age need 9 to 12 hours of sleep in a 24-hour day.
  3. A. 8–10 hours. Kids 13 to 18 years of age need 8 to 10 hours of sleep in a 24-hour day.
  4. True. This shift in a teen’s circadian rhythms makes them want to go to sleep later and get up later.
  5. B. The second developmental stage of cognitive maturation that teens are going through is best fueled by adequate sleep.
  6. True. Some teens’ sleep needs can increase above that of a child’s or an adult’s.
  7. E. All of the Above
  8. True. A sleep deficit has been linked to an increased risk of self-harm, suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts in teens.
  9. D. All of the above
  10. D. All of the above

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