What Dreams About Your Teeth Falling Out Might Really Mean

What Dreams About Your Teeth Falling Out Might Really Mean

by WILLIAM NERESTANT, DDS

Dreams can be confusing and intense experiences, and those that involve your teeth falling out are no exception.  Dreams of teeth falling out, turning to dust, or cracking into pieces are stressful and unpleasant, and they can be caused by a number of issues.  

Explanations Behind Dreams About Teeth Falling Out

There are no hard and fast rules when it comes to dream interpretations, and there are many different ways to interpret a dream about your teeth falling out.  Some cultures’ interpretations go beyond mere explanation and maintain that such dreams are a prediction that someone you know will die. The belief that dreams are predictions is rejected by modern dream interpreter psychologists, and most point to stress and anxiety as the reasoning behind having dreams where bad things happen to your teeth.

Stress of all kinds can manifest into dreams about teeth falling out; from stress about the usual topics— work, relationships, money, and more— to worry about the actual state of your oral health.  Our unconscious minds deal with stress in a number of odd ways, and dreams about losing teeth may just be one of them.

Dream interpreters also believe that dreams about lost teeth stem from worry and anxiety over growing older.  Since the chance of tooth loss does increase as we age, it’s not too much of a stretch to see the worry about our own mortality in dreams about failing teeth.

If worry over your oral health is affecting either your sleep or your waking hours, make an appointment with your dentist to improve your oral health and banish those fears for good.

This column is sponsored by Midtown Dental.   

   BIO: Dr. William Nerestant received his Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) degree from the University of Detroit/Mercy School of Dentistry in Michigan. After serving and being recognized for his meritorious service in the Air Force as an officer in the Dental Corps, he currently serves patients at Midtown Dental in Lakeland. For more information, visit mymidtowndental.com or call (863) 226-0987.   

 

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