Mental health moment: Meditation is medication

Mental health moment: Meditation is medication

IT’S TRUE. Certain kinds of meditation may work better for you than others. If you’re anxious about the future, a guided imagery meditation — about visualizing what you want — might be good.

You might want to focus on a goal or just one simple phrase, such as “I am whole, healthy, and at peace with myself and others.” Or you can picture your dream home, job, relationships, and anything else you desire. Your brain doesn’t know the difference between reality and visualization, so you will feel good if you think about good things. The sky is the limit.

Speaking of the sky, the famous Navy flight squadron, the Blue Angels, chair-fly immediately before they get set to jet! This means they sit in chairs with their eyes closed and visualize in real-time the maneuvers they are about to perform. This keeps them rehearsed as if they had just flown, so when they get in the cockpit they are prepared.

For those of us who aren’t jet pilots, we can use music with no beat and not much melody. It calms the brain, slows the heart rate and is actually able to aid in keeping your immune system in tune. Just like music. Meditation can turn the cacophony in your brain into harmony in your life.

If you’re in panic mode, then mindfulness may be the best choice. Just noticing where you are and paying attention to your five senses in the present moment is all you need to get the physical to override the mental. Stop thinking about what you’re panicky about and just take note of your surroundings. What are you seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, and tasting? It will take your mind off the panic of the future and get you back to the present moment.

Be attuned to all things positive! Become immune to all things negative.

CREDIT

article by MARY JOYE, LMHC, PA

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Mary Joye, LMHC, PA, is a licensed mental health counselor with offices in Lakeland and Winter Haven. She holds a Master of Arts in Counseling from Trevecca Nazarene University in Nashville, Tennessee. For more information, visit www.maryjoyecounseling.com.

Posted January 29, 2016

Categories: Features, Health News