Family Health: Five tips for healthier aging

LIFESTYLE CHOICES have a great impact on our overall wellness as we age. Below are five tips for making better decisions to ensure healthier aging.

MENTAL AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Mental and physical activity are extremely important as you age. A 2015 study found that regular physical activity increases brain oxygen levels, aiding in the prevention of memory loss and reducing the risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, strokes, and diabetes. Keeping your brain active also helps prevent Alzheimer’s, so tackle your “books-to-read” list and complete that daily crossword puzzle.

STRESS REDUCTION

Stress increases chronic pain, disease, and memory loss. Those suffering extreme negative emotions are 8.5 times more likely to have a heart attack. Socializing and spending time with animals are effective methods for stress reduction.

HEALTHY DIET

Diets rich in nutrients are associated with brain health and memory loss prevention. Eating a balanced diet and avoiding trans fats decrease instances of heart attacks, strokes, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s.

PAIN MANAGEMENT

If you suffer from chronic pain, endorphins released from exercise, meditation, and physical therapy can relieve that pain. Additionally, Trinity Medical Group offers pain management that can be tailored to your lifestyle.

CHRONIC DISEASE MANAGEMENT

Following diagnosis of a chronic disease, regular visits to a physician are extremely important for health management. Trinity Medical Group can provide you with a treatment plan.

Smart lifestyle choices are imperative for healthy aging. Trinity Medical Group can educate you on how to achieve it. Call (863) 299-2636 to schedule a preventive visit today.

This column is sponsored by Trinity Medical Group.

CREDIT

column by DR. ADAM PARKER

BIO: Adam Parker, DO, is a board-certified and licensed family practitioner in the state of Florida. He is also a licensed Doctor of Osteopathy — manipulative medicine and techniques that have been shown to improve treatment results for a range of problems when used in conjunction with traditional surgery and prescriptions. In addition to his work at Trinity Medical Center, Dr. Parker is a physician at Lakeland Regional and Bartow Regional hospitals.

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